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I did run off to check the facts so I didn't look like a complete moron after this post went up, but thankfully they are all true! These books are just good fun. They're tiny, but I could happily read them over and over and I doubt they'd ever get stale. I've just done a quick Google, and apparently Gideon Defoe is in talks with Aardman Animation to turn the last two books into a movie as well.

I know, I'm raving and I'm sorry. I'll stop when you finally cave in and buy a copy Nov 27, Melissa rated it it was amazing Shelves: pirates. As I have read "Moby Dick" in its entirety, I loved the not-so-subtle jabs at that novel. My favorite quote: "The other pirates were doing their best to make conversation with the whaler crew, but they were a strange bunch, and most of their stories placed a lot more emphasis on icebergs and interminable months spent at sea rather than feasts and fighting.

The Pirates! In an Adventure with Moby Dick - Reissued (Paperback, New edition)

Also, just as one of the whalers would actually seem to be getting to the point of an anecdote, they were liable to wander off sud Hilarious! Also, just as one of the whalers would actually seem to be getting to the point of an anecdote, they were liable to wander off suddenly on long and rather dull tangents about whale anatomy or things like that. I love that the Pirate Captain really has no idea what he's doing, but always ends up spectacularly completely the task at hand.

I also love his attachment to his Prize Ham and was quite sad at the end of this adventure when he lost it. I look forward to seeing what happens in the next Adventure! The illustrations in the front and back insides are also entertaining - the map in the front tracks the location of the white whale around the US where he picks up a casino dealer's hat in Las Vegas, enjoys some beach time in SC, and picks up Mickey Ears in FL!

I also enjoy the "other great titles in The Pirates!


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The list goes on for 5 pages of hilarity ending with "The Pirates! Are Overdoing It A Bit". Defoe's 'The Pirates! I love them, especially the one with Communists. This absurd adventure is as hilarious as ever. To determine whether you'd enjoy it, consider this quote: 'Ahab paused, and turned to the pirates.

The Pirates! In an Adventure with Moby Dick

There was an embarrassed silence. You see? I was also delighted by the lengthy list of other titles in the series, at the end of the book. It includes such gems as, 'The Pirates! In An Adventure With Wasps'.

The Pirates! In an Adventure with Communists

I'd definitely read those. It's also been just under a month since I actually went and read it, so my thoughts are a lil' cloudy, but it just wasn't as good as The Pirates!


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In an Adventure with Scientists. Sure, it was fun, breezy; an easy read, but while the plot matches Scientists in inventiveness, it just doesn't have the same spark to it. Alas, Ahab was fun, Pirate Captain's writing skills were surprisingl 3. Jul 28, Sarah rated it really liked it Shelves: adventure , british , historical , humor , series , quest , male , maritime , swashbuckling , post-modern. An endearing little story about a pirate and his devoted prized ham I think.

Recommended to rabbitprincess by: the film of the first book in the series. Shelves: bibliotheque , What to do to avoid incurring the wrath of Cutlass Liz, pirate-ship dealer and the bloodthirstiest lass on the high seas? Apparently there's a fella named Ahab who's offering a sizeable reward for the capture of a certain white whale… This is the second in "The Pirates" series by Gideon Defoe. I picked it up after seeing The Pirates! I did actually request the first book as well, but this one arrived earlier. It may be more helpful for those completely new to the series to start with the first book, or perhaps see the movie I did find that helped with visualizing the characters.

I whipped through this book in very short order -- it has only pages and the book itself is quite small. I also spent pretty much the entire book grinning like an idiot. I did think I would spend more time laughing out loud than actually happened, but non-stop grinning is pretty good too.

It's very, very silly, which can be just what the doctor ordered in some instances. And I really did almost laugh out loud on the bus when I caught this dig at Moby-Dick: "just as one of the whalers would actually seem to be getting to the point of an anecdote, they were liable to wander off suddenly on long and rather dull tangents about whale anatomy or things like that. Will you like it, you ask?

The Pirates! In an Adventure with Ahab by Gideon Defoe

Well, Eric Idle he of Monty Python fame endorsed the first book, so if you like Pythonesque humour you may like this as well. And if you like stories about mishaps on ships, there are plenty of those here for you to enjoy. I would probably not recommend reading all of the Pirates! Save it for a day when you can really use some cheering up. Feb 19, Zora rated it really liked it. When the pirates run out of cannonballs, they have to improvise: "We could fire the limes, sir," suggested the pirate with a scarf. Fair enough," said the Pirate Captain.

Otherwise we risk looking stupid. Of course they can, says the Pirate Captain. The crew of nameless pirates is off on another adventure, this on When the pirates run out of cannonballs, they have to improvise: "We could fire the limes, sir," suggested the pirate with a scarf. The crew of nameless pirates is off on another adventure, this one with Ahab, obsession, and white whales. Also with Las Vegas, used boat salespeople, show business, and hams.

Wacky fun, plenty of laugh aloud moments and irreverence. Defoe is a clever and funny writer. And he makes me want to be a pirate. Jul 08, Kelsey Dangelo-Worth rated it it was amazing. The Pirates need a new ship, so they borrow heavily to buy a luxurious ship. Hijinks ensue in this hilarious, cleverly written, silly adventure that is highly reminiscent of Monty Python meets Monkey Island: surrealist, childlike imagination and logic, in this charming and hilarious take on Moby Dick.

Grade: A. These books are so fantastically clever and funny it makes me sad more people don't read them. Mar 25, Erin Collins rated it really liked it Shelves: series-not-complete , read-in I'm a sexy lady albatross! Nov 04, Ciara rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: people who like clever funny books, lovers of ham, beard appreciation societies. Shelves: especially-great-novels , read-in After he splashes out on the fancy new ship, the Lovely Emma, he finds himself spending six thousand doubloons he doesn't have.

In debt to the beautiful but deadly Cutlass Liz, who will happily cut them easily in two, he and his crew must get the cash. And fast! Along the way in their desperate race to find the cash before time runs out Cutlass Liz gave them an hourglass, filled with the sands that ar Review Taken From The Pewter Wolf The Pirate Captain can't seem to keep out of trouble, can he?

Along the way in their desperate race to find the cash before time runs out Cutlass Liz gave them an hourglass, filled with the sands that are actually grounded-up bones from pirates who didn't pay on time , the Pirate Captain and his crew go from Nantucket, Las Vegas and then in search of a mythical white whale Now, I really have high hopes for this, and though it wasn't up to par with Scientists am going to use shorthand, if that alright , it is just as mad, bonkers and funny as its predecessor.

How did I not know that? But you guys will get the stupidness of the Pirate Captain! Aug 28, Kristina rated it really liked it Shelves: adultish. Ham is very important to a pirate diet, and Ahab's okay even though he started out in that horrid Moby Dick book. The Pirates help him track the whale. To Las Vegas and beyond Sep 12, Vohumanu rated it really liked it. Very silly and very funny. I smirked a few times but otherwise this was just really, really tired - or I'm just an old cynic. One or the other.

Feb 17, Austenite rated it really liked it. Ridiculously hilarious. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. After the main-mast falls over for the third time in a week the pirate with a scarf reluctantly and cautiously approaches the Pirate Captain about perhaps getting a new boat. After admitting to his number two that perhaps covering the holes in his quarters with dashing pictures of himself isn't the best way to keep a boat afloat, seeing as a stiff breeze could conceivably kill off half the pirate crew and the Pirate Captain himself has never bothered to learn to swim he agrees that they go to Na After the main-mast falls over for the third time in a week the pirate with a scarf reluctantly and cautiously approaches the Pirate Captain about perhaps getting a new boat.

After admitting to his number two that perhaps covering the holes in his quarters with dashing pictures of himself isn't the best way to keep a boat afloat, seeing as a stiff breeze could conceivably kill off half the pirate crew and the Pirate Captain himself has never bothered to learn to swim he agrees that they go to Nantucket and Cutlass Liz's boatyard. There they run into two interesting people. One is Ahab, a dour whaler who is searching the world for the great white whale who took his leg off with a big chomp, the other is the Pirate Captain's Nemesis, Black Bellamy.

Desperate to quickly get the cash for fear of Cutlass Liz and her ways of dealing with those who don't pay the pirates go in search of treasure! When that fails they try gambling. When that fails they try putting on a Vegas show. When that fails the pirate in red suggests perhaps they try some piracy? When that fails they just might take up Ahab's quest, they keep running into him and he's now offering a reward equal to the cost of their new boat. But can the Pirate Captain and his crew really succeed where Ahab has failed?

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And if they do can they succeed before Cutlass Liz gets violent? What seems like years ago now, probably because it was, I remember seeing a few of Gideon Defoe's Pirates! I promptly forgot about them because do you realize the number of books I look at on a daily basis? It's seriously staggering. But shortly thereafter Lauren Willig mentioned them in passing as being hilarious so this confluence of events led me to order the first two books, handily sold as one volume, and I put it on my bookshelf and promptly forgot about them again.

Fast forward to and Aardman Animation has adapted the first book for the screen. For some reason all my encounters with Gideon Defoe's work was promptly forgotten until his third book, The Pirates! In an Adventure with Communists, was picked out of the hat for book club in Not being one to start in the middle of a series I picked up my copy of the first two books, promptly fell in love, ordered the next three books and plundered my way through them all.

The thing is, I've always had a soft spot for pirates.

IN THE HEART OF THE SEA Trailer (Moby Dick Movie, Chris Hemworth - 2014)

A young girl wishes for a boat to travel the world in with her little brother. I wanted a boat just like it for myself. A pirate ship in miniature with flora and fauna and the coziest rooms you could ever imagine that weathered all storms. As I grew up there were Lego pirate ships and Playmobil pirate ships that actually floated helmed by my Star Wars figures.

There were hideouts down by the railway tracks and in my back yard with hammocks, just like on a real pirate ship. Some were there to see Johnny Depp, some to see Orlando Bloom, and some to see an anvil three stories tall. I was there for the pirates! But these Pirates! They are the love children of Blackadder and the briny deep, with historical cameos thrown in just as much as historical accuracy is thrown out.

With this lovability that makes you just want to take them home give them a big feast predominately of ham and tell them a good bedtime story before tucking them in for the night. Gideon Defoe's writing combines the wit and love of footnotes of Terry Pratchett with the absurdity of Monty Python. Yet it's so uniquely his own that while I can draw comparisons all day it will never do justice to a series of books that need to be read for their hats and their love of ham. And I'm not joking that once you start you won't be able to stop until you've read them all.

From Darwin and Bobo, the "man-panzee," to Ahab and what hunting the great white whale does to the Pirate Captain's sanity, to Wagner trying to blacken the name of Communism, to beekeeping on St. Helena where Napoleon causes quite a ruckus, to Byron and the Pirate Captain forming a true bromance while the Pirate Captain tries to woo Mary Godwin away from Shelley, you will just pillage your way through Defoe's prose. Yet what makes this series really unique is that, aside from them being kind of hopeless as pirates, is that the characters names aren't really names, instead being character descriptions.

There's the Pirate Captain and his faithful number two, the pirate with a scarf, there's the pirate in green, the pirate with rickets, the albino pirate, Jennifer, and every one's least favorite pirate, the pirate in red. While this could be viewed as just a humorous joke at the readers expense, I mean, think how many times we as readers when faced with a new story with oodles of characters has picked up on a character trait to remember them all by?

Instead I don't think it's about readers and the inability to remember names, instead I think it's a clever conceit. While yes, there is a bit of poking fun at stereotypes, I think it actually goes beyond this and is making the character archetypes. He's the only one that matters, suck it Black Bellamy! Just like the pirate with a scarf is the perfect number two, and the pirate in red is the perfect red shirt for us to hate on. These are the lovable essence of all the pirates we wanted to sail the high seas with as a kid and therefore we gleefully go with them wherever that may be.

Even if there might be ghosts. And we all know how scared pirates are of ghosts! Band of Misfits, is doing a disservice to the books. While these pirates are true characters by making them cartoonishly animated it has turned them into caricatures. This movie has lessened them. In the books they are larger than life fiendish friends, on the screen they are a kind of boring movie.

Which is really odd when you consider that Gideon Defoe wrote the screenplay. When I think back to when I first saw the movie, it in no way made me want to rush out and read the books, which is such a shame. Think of all those people out in the world who are judging these books based on that movie? The movie has far more "presence" and it's overshadowing these lovely, sweet, and comical adventures. When reading the books I thought how much they reminded me of the TV series Galavant.

There's an absurdity and a gallantry and a sense of humor that makes it similar to The Pirates! Plus done as live action, there's a basis in reality with having actors like the brilliant Timothy Omundson bring the characters to life. This humor works best with the dichotomy of the absurd versus the real.

Which leads me into my next point, when is there going to be a live action movie with Timothy Omundson as the Pirate Captain? As for why I chose to pick their adventure with Ahab as my favorite? Partly it's because I had yet to read them hanging out with the Romantics last year, but also it has to do with this balance of fantasy and reality that elevates the humor in these books. In taking The Pirates! The fact that when they desperately need money to pay for their new boat that actual piracy is their second to last resort shows where their priorities lie.

They'd rather look at clouds and have feasts with ham. Again and again it's brought home how not at home they are on the sea. They know nothing about whales! As for mermaids While Black Bellamy may be a successful pirate, he isn't that enjoyable a pirate to be around. He's too suave, too together. I actually like my pirates a little on the lost side. Perhaps that is the one thing that the movie got right? They are a band of misfits, and I love them so much for not conforming to any stereotype. They are archetypes and I love them! Apr 01, Mark Collins rated it it was amazing.

This series is delightful. This book is hilarious and lighthearted and brings me joy. Loved it! Voiced by the same actor that did the first book, the characterizations is delightful, yet, in this he has an American character; hearing a British person attempt an American accent gives me empathy for how British people feel when an American attempts a British accent. From from what I have heard in years past "Piratical ethics: Not stealing from a man that offers you grog is just about at the top of the list", is one of the many points of etiquette one learns in this installment of The Pirates!

From from what I have heard in years past, most Brits make Americans sound like New York gangsters of the 30s. In this, John Lee's Ahab sounds part Elvis, part cowboy. The absurdity quotient slides low in this work's first half, giving it more of a lightly tingled air of chuckles in the atmosphere of its anachronisms.

The focus is more upon the allusions to Moby Dick, and the trouble the Pirates find themselves as they attempt to pay off a debt, in schemes befitting comic characters. It wraps up tightly by revealing the importance of a prized ham. As in the previous installment, there are lists of helpful information. More lessons: getting into debt is not a matter to be taken lightly, also making an extravagant gesture to impress a girl is pretty stupid, and most importantly of all, the grass might look greener in show business, or whaling, or something like that but that when it comes down to it, you're often better off sticking with what you know, so long as what you know is kicking about the High Seas being a Pirate that is.

Learn More About section offers legitimate information regarding debt counseling, whale conservation, and Nantucket. Elements of this book appear in the Aardman film. In an Adventure with Moby Dick: Reissued is a very short book; it takes less than an hour to read. It's obviously aimed at prepubescent boys who are heavily into silly humour and some jokes and the sexual innuendo will be above their head.

I'm a grumpy old geezer who get's it, hopefully, but does my age preclude me from getting the silly jokes?


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I should hope not. It's come to my attention that the old girl's a little bit past her best. And I can hardly maintain my reputation as a terror of the high seas with bits falling off the boat all the time, can I? The Pirate Captain is in trouble. Eager to appease his crew with a boat that has a functioning mast, fewer holes and cannons that actually fire, he splashes out on the fancy new Lovely Emma, spending six thousand doubloons he doesn't have.

Finding themselves in debt to the beautiful but deadly Cutlass Liz - or the butcher of Barbados, as she's otherwise known - the pirates need to raise some money fast. In a desperate race against time our heroes embark on an adventure that will take them from the shores of Nantucket to the bright lights of Las Vegas, to the ends of the earth in search of a mythical white whale, and even, perhaps, into the dark depths of madness. But hopefully they'll be home in time for tea. Two Skull Hunt on Pygmy Island. Knifed My Way to a Diamond Pit.